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Laurent TIA
Digitally Represented Artist
Agora Gallery
530 West 25th StreetNew York,NY
Previous Artist
  • Dans la case du Guérisseur Dogon
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
63" x 23.5" 

    Dans la case du Guérisseur Dogon

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    63" x 23.5"
  • L'union des Cultures
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
63" x 23.5" 

    L'union des Cultures

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    63" x 23.5"
  • Masks and Primary Philosophy
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
27.5" x 23.5" 

    Masks and Primary Philosophy

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    27.5" x 23.5"
  • Masques et Initiation
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
31.5" x 23.5" 

    Masques et Initiation

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    31.5" x 23.5"
  • Métamorphose Culturelle
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
63" x 23.5" 

    Métamorphose Culturelle

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    63" x 23.5"
  • The Colas Seller Dan
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
31.5" x 23.5" 

    The Colas Seller Dan

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    31.5" x 23.5"
  • Trésor
Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
31.5" x 23.5" 

    Trésor

    Oil & Mixed Media on Wood
    31.5" x 23.5"
  • We are all slain lambs because to survive we must overcome trials intelligently.  Because life is a jungle, not to say a fight
Bas Relief
47.2" x 23.6" 

    We are all slain lambs because to survive we must overcome trials intelligently. Because life is a jungle, not to say a fight

    Bas Relief
    47.2" x 23.6"
Next Artist
Laurent TIA

Ivorian artist Laurent Tia descends from a long lineage of sacred art sculptors. Rooted in the tradition of the native Manding people, Tia brings forth the ancestral knowledge of confreries de masques: elite associations of masked dancers that played a religious, recreational, and edifying role in society. Tia was educated at Institut National des Arts, in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and currently resides near Avignon, in southern France. His intimate understanding of occidental and African histories and cultures spurred the desire to find harmonious ground between two seemingly discordant worlds.

In L’Union des cultures, for example, Mona Lisa–the epitome of traditional European art–is seen holding a shekere, an African percussion instrument, her Renaissance attire paired with a kaftan and a tribal mask, partially covering her face. Tia’s choice of materials further reflects this underlying tenet: oil paint is complemented by a mix of kaolin, sawdust, and natural pigments, which coupled with dramatic chiaroscuro add a prominent sculptural quality to the work. In so doing, Tia succeeds in accomplishing his unifying mission. By bringing together Western pictorial traditions and Africa’s sculptural heritage, he sets an example of graceful coexistence amongst cultures.