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Kriss Munsya
The Chelsea International Fine Art Competition Exhibition
Agora Gallery
530 West 25th StreetNew York,NY
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  • Keep The Car Running. Highway Reflection - The Eraser, 2020
Photograph on Fine Art Paper
44" x 35" 

    Keep The Car Running. Highway Reflection - The Eraser, 2020

    Photograph on Fine Art Paper
    44" x 35"
  • The Mother Lode. Domestic Attraction - The Eraser, 2020
Photograph on Fine Art Paper
44" x 35" 

    The Mother Lode. Domestic Attraction - The Eraser, 2020

    Photograph on Fine Art Paper
    44" x 35"
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Kriss Munsya

KRISS MUNSYA

The Chelsea International Fine Art Competition Exhibition
August 23 – August 30, 2022
Reception: Thursday, August 25, 2022 6-8 PM

Kriss Munsya’s recent photographic series, ‘The Eraser,’ juxtaposes experiences of the past with desires of the future. It is a story of change and transformation that centers a Black man revisiting experiences that have been normalized in critical reflection of internalized supremacy. Things that at the time he thought were normal now have new meaning and he wants to share the lessons within. Born in DRC in the 80’s and raised in Brussels, he was confronted with his “differences” early on.

The discrimination and violence he experienced in childhood left a mark – one that grew to obfuscate his sense of self-worth. The internalization of these experiences disoriented him in search of self-preservation. It took him years to acknowledge how this distanced him from his loved ones, community, and self. He took refuge in the distance. Safety was his priority. In his adulthood, his memories are calling on him to clarify his worth and reorient his efforts toward justice. He wants to get back to those he’d distanced himself from.

With ‘The Eraser,’ he aims to translate his experiences into invitations to reflect on the impacts of supremacy. This project reflects critically on the past to inform transformational offerings for the future. As the protagonist revisits memories to reimagine his past, he tries to erase the dominance of whiteness by transposing Blackness. However, memory is not easy to manipulate! Digging into the past always brings up unexpected things. With that, it imagines creative reclamations of space.