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Bojko Jerman
Dreamscapes
Agora Gallery
530 West 25th StreetNew York,NY
Previous Artist
  • A15
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
13" x 13" 

    A15

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    13" x 13"
  • A16
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
13" x 13" 

    A16

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    13" x 13"
  • K94
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
20" x 20" 

    K94

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    20" x 20"
  • L2
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
13" x 13" 

    L2

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    13" x 13"
  • L37
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
20" x 20" 

    L37

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    20" x 20"
  • L1
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
13" x 13" 

    L1

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    13" x 13"
  • D100
Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
20" x 20" 

    D100

    Hand Silver Engraving in Painted Aluminum
    20" x 20"
Next Artist
Bojko Jerman

BOJKO JERMAN

Dreamscapes
April 9 – April 29, 2021
Reception: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6-8 PM

Slovenian artist Boijko Jerman works in the technique of silver engraving. He applies black paint on an aluminum plate, and uses a needle to engrave onto the surface. Because the lines are engraved in metal, they are luminous and reflect light, therefore the appearance is fluid and depends on the type and direction of light. The pieces are dynamic and seductive, with interesting and engaged surface textures. The process of creating his works requires extreme precision and steady hands, there is little room for mistakes, as they can’t be concealed. Jerman developed his original technique while studying architecture, a field in which he worked professionally until retirement.

The artist uses his work to explore existential questions; he attempts to present a humanist contemplation of our purpose and mission in life. The most important element of his work is the viewer’s engagement with the content. He hopes they view it intimately and subjectively. His work is not simply ornamental, it requires participation and understanding, which he uses as an allegory for our responsibility to be active participants in our worlds.